Green Water is a perfume from the French niche house Jacques Fath, who has decades (nearly centuries) of experience creating outstanding fragrances as well as fashion designs. The original Green Water perfume debuted in 1946 during the postwar period and is one of the first, classic aromatic citrus, a true perfume masterpiece that is still kept in Osmotheque. A new edition of Green Water perfume was released in 2015, with an intriguing backstory that encompasses the Sherlockian spirit and the adventures of the remarkable Cecile Zarokian.

Green Water

Along with Christian Dior and Pierre Balmain, Jacques Fath was the fashion designer who had the most influence on French fashion in the 1950s. The reason for his (relative) obscurity, at least in comparison to the other two, is that he died early, at the age of 40. Hubert de Givenchy, Guy Laroche, and Valentino Garavani all grew up in his studio, and his creations were an essential part of the wardrobes of the stylish and glamorous Parisians.

According to Luca Turin’s book (The Perfume Guide 2018) and an interview with Cecile Zarokian herself, recreating the legendary 1946 classic was not an easy process. Because the only copy of the old version was in Osmotheque in Versailles, which is known for its extremely strict rules, which state that you can come to try the perfume at any time, but you will never get a sample or the original formula. The entire project of developing the new version of perfume appeared doomed, but Cecile Zerokian’s daring spirit, analytical mind, and patience bore fruit. Not without a huge amount of effort. Cecile returned to Osmotheque many times, smelled original Green Water, and recreated the iconic classic using her knowledge, talent, and memory.

But it was not the end of their struggles. They were aware that neroli, an exceedingly expensive ingredient, made up a large portion of the Green Water perfume formula. Instead of striking a bargain, they chose extravagance. As a result, the new perfume worthy of old glory has been made.

Green Water is the epitome of fresh perfume. Its uniqueness is not so much reflected in the unusual mixture of fragrant notes, as in the unusual presentation of the same. Like the apple in painting, each technique gives us a different impression of the apple, even though it is “just an ordinary apple”. Similarly, the citrus notes that dominate this perfume provide an unusual, smooth, almost latex impression and texture. This is kinky bergamot in all its S&M glory. After several hours, the extremely fresh perfume turns into a soft, sophisticated mixture of citrus, musk and ambergris, which seem to convey that even behind the strong masculine facade there is a softer, romantic side. Of course, if you know how to dig deep enough. Although it is classified as unisex, I still think it is more appropriate as a daily choice for men.

[Fragrance notes] top notes: neroli, bergamot, mandarin; middle notes: mint, basil, tarragon; base notes: vetiver, oakmoss, ambergris.

[Fragrance group] citrus aromatic.

The creator of the perfume is Cecile Zarokian.